How it works

Roll ‘n’ Recycle® concept is easy to understand and even easier to execute. In just a few easy steps, you can recycle the Marked semi-rigid plastics in your household recycling bin!

How it Works

The Roll ‘n’ Recycle® team has worked tirelessly with packaging manufacturers, brand owners and recycling specialists to ensure that with just a few steps, Roll ‘n’ Recycle® packaging can now be recycled in household recycle bins! HooRah!

Buy products marked with ‘Roll ‘n’ Recycle®

Buy products marked with ‘Roll ‘n’ Recycle®

When you buy products displaying the ‘Roll ‘n’ Recycle® Mark, you can be excited that not only will you love the product inside, but the packaging will be recycled when disposed.

1
FOLD (if indicated on packaging) then ROLL IT! It is the most important thing you need to do

FOLD (if indicated on packaging) then ROLL IT! It is the most important thing you need to do

Once packaging is empty, roll as shown until you finish with a cylinder in the shape of a "9" or a "6" (you see it below in step 4).

2
Stick it real good!

Stick it real good!

Lift and peel the supplied sticker and stick firmly where indicated to ensure the shape (a "9" or a "6" shape) is maintained in your recycle bin and the recycling collection journey.

3
Place the rolled packaging into your Recycling Bin at home

Place the rolled packaging into your Recycling Bin at home

This one is self-explanatory. An adult, child, pet or even a favourable gust of wind can take it, just make sure it gets into the recycling bin.

4
Voilà!  You are a recycling magician!

Voilà! You are a recycling magician!

Do you know what you just did? You just turned a flat “two dimensional” piece of packaging into a “three dimensional” shape. This means it can be sorted correctly at a facility once picked up and recycled.

Nice one Copperfield!

5

Why does a three-dimensional cylinder shape work, but not a flat two-dimensional shape?

When it comes to packaging, even the smallest details can have an impact on recyclability, including the packaging shape, size, weight, inks, adhesives and the materials used.

This is where the genius but also, the simplicity of Roll ‘n’ Recycle® comes into play. It takes packaging that was previously NOT recyclable in household recycle bins, and via you, changes its shape so it CAN be placed in household recycle bin. Like magic!

Why does a three-dimensional cylinder shape work, but not a flat two-dimensional shape?
Why does a three-dimensional cylinder shape work, but not a flat two-dimensional shape?

Can your plastic go in the recycle bin?

In the diagram below, you can see the factors involved that determine if something can be placed in the household recycle bin.

chart

When you see the Roll ‘n’ Recycle® Mark on packaging, it means we’ve taken care of the size, weight, inks used, adhesives and colourants/dyes but we need your help with ..……shape!

By rolling and sticking the packaging in place, the packaging is recyclable via your household recycling bin!

That’s all fine in theory, but does it work in the real world?

Yes, it works alright! Explore the results from our Truck Collection & Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) Trial at Suez Spring Farm Recovery Facility, NSW.

RnR Trial Report
That’s all fine in theory, but does it work in the real world?
That’s all fine in theory, but does it work in the real world?

This video is showing flat "two dimensional" packaging travelling UP the conveyor and entering the paper stream (will NOT be recycled).

 

This video is the "three dimensional" ROLLED packaging dropping below the conveyor and into the rigid plastics stream (WILL BE recycled).

What about plastic packaging that doesn’t have the Roll ‘n’ Recycle mark?

Anything is better than it going to landfill right? Plastic pouches that do not include the Roll ‘n’ Recycle® Mark may be recyclable at drop-off bins at the front of the major retail stores. Please check our friends’ at REDcycle’s website for information about this program in Australia.

Visit REDcycle
What about plastic packaging that doesn’t have the Roll ‘n’ Recycle mark?
What about plastic packaging that doesn’t have the Roll ‘n’ Recycle mark?